@TeacherToolkit

In 2010, Ross Morrison McGill founded @TeacherToolkit from a simple Twitter account in which he rapidly became the 'most followed teacher on social media in the UK'. In 2015, he was nominated for '500 Most Influential People in Britain' in The Sunday Times as one of the most influential in the field of education - he remains the only classroom teacher to feature to this day ... Sharing online as @TeacherToolkit, he rebuilt this website (c2008) into what you are now reading, as one of the 'most influential blogs on education in the UK', winning the number one spot at the UK Blog Awards (2018). Today, he is currently a PGCE tutor and is researching 'social media and its influence on education policy' for his EdD at Cambridge University. In 1993, he started teaching and is an experienced school leader working in some of the toughest schools in London. He is also a former Teaching Awards winner for 'Teacher of the Year in a Secondary School, London' (2004) and has written several books on teaching (2013-2018). Read more...

5 thoughts on “10 Teaching Ideas to Bin in 2017

  • 8th January 2017 at 8:19 pm
    Permalink

    seriously irritated that judgements are still passed by SMT who are not qualified to do so….agree with all you say.Thank you-do you do INSETs in primary schools……

    Reply
    • 8th January 2017 at 8:57 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Lorraine. Thanks for the comment. Yes and hope to do more in the summer term. Send me an email. Thanks.

      Reply
  • 9th January 2017 at 8:04 am
    Permalink

    Nice list! Although I haven’t taught in the UK for some time, I can empathise with some of your concerns. Not sure about the last one though. Written feedback (eg. feedback via google doc comments) can allow for anytime, anywhere progression. I don’t have to be in the room at the same time to hear the words come out of your mouth – and we can still have a ‘conversation’ on the document thanks to the wonders of technology. Whilst one student may appreciate short bursts of verbal feedback, another may find it more effective to access written comments at home, or at break time, when they have time to read through and process them. If written succinctly, they can be just as effective as verbal feedback.

    Reply
  • 9th January 2017 at 10:39 am
    Permalink

    As I read this this morning I pretty much agreed with it al (not completely convinced about no written feedback, the problem at my school is the frequency it is required!). Sadly, I have got to school this morning to find out that not only are we having to enter data 6 times a year for KS4 students (has been the case for the last two years), we also need to enter it 6 times a year for every PP student. Data overload!

    Reply
    • 9th January 2017 at 2:36 pm
      Permalink

      Ouch! I can’t imagine the data will change too often if you are reporting it every 8 weeks! What a waste of your time. I think 3 assessment points in the year is sensible, even more sensible if you have an admin team to input all of the data for you.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.