#1MinCPD: Visiting A Potential New School

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Are you looking for a new school to work with?

Arranging a school tour is a great way to get a feel for your potential new place of work. It gives you a chance to weigh up the setting and connect with the teachers and pupils who show you around. First impressions count!

1. Look at the website before you visit …

This will give you an indication about the school’s ethos and might spark conversation points. Consider initial ‘searches’ on social media to see what the general public say about the school.

2. Actively listen

The person leading the tour will likely give you a good insight into daily life and school ethos. If you are listening intently, you can avoid asking questions that have already been answered.

3. Ask some questions

If you ask too many questions, this can become overwhelming for others in the group and appear as over-dominating. Find a balance to develop an understanding of the workplace.

4. Be polite!

Smile and greet pupils or staff as you enter their classrooms. Err on the side of caution rather than being over-exuberant.

5. Compliment

If you see something you like, say so!

6. Relate

If you notice an approach, scheme or ethos that reflects your experiences or interest, refer to this in your interview …

7. Say ‘Thank you’

If you intend on applying, say ‘thank you’ and let them know that you look forward to ‘making an application’.

Top Tip

As you wander around, decide whether you can imagine yourself working at the school. This will give you a clue about whether you want to apply. Why not try the 5-Minute Interview Plan and get fully prepared?

Hanna Beech

Hanna Beech has been teaching for ten years and has a range of experience across Key Stages 1 and 2 in a large Primary School in Kent. She is a phase leader for Years 3 and 4, and also leads on teaching and learning for the setting. Her absolute passion is pupil wellbeing and involvement, and finding ways to ensure that learning is optimised for all. She is fascinated by all subjects relating to education, but spends a lot of time reading around the science behind learning and the learning brain.

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