#1MinCPD: How To Pitch A New Idea

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How can you sell a sparkly new idea?

Suggesting new initiatives can make huge changes to the staff, pupils and parents at your school, but approaching those in charge with new ideas isn’t always simple. Try this method below to pitch your new idea.

The Hear Me Out Method

  1. Don’t be tempted to talk to anyone about your idea straight away. Let the idea rest for two days. If you’re still as excited about the idea afterward, you know it has some staying power.
  2. Research and read. Think it through. Be thorough.
  3. Be prepared to talk in depth about why this idea is good.
  4. Think about the impact on pupils’ learning; teaching staff and on parents.
  5. All ideas have downfalls, limitations or sticking points. Predict and plan ways to overcome these to argue your case.
  6. Predict the response. How might people react? Plan your responses.
  7. Request a half-hour slot to discuss your idea with the relevant person. Don’t be tempted to run into their office and share the idea on your schedule!
  8. Present your idea confidently. Ask for a chance to trial the idea in your class.
  9. Trial it properly. Give your idea the best shot you can and teach what you preach.
  10. Book another meeting with the SLT explaining how the trial went and what might need to be amended.

Why is it a good strategy?

If your idea is truly good, prove it by knowing it, living it and adapting it to perfection. The proof is in the pudding!

Tip

Keep communication open throughout your trial so that the idea is fresh in the minds of your Senior Leadership Team.

Hanna Beech

Hanna Beech has been teaching for ten years and has a range of experience across Key Stages 1 and 2 in a large Primary School in Kent. She is a phase leader for Years 3 and 4, and also leads on teaching and learning for the setting. Her absolute passion is pupil wellbeing and involvement, and finding ways to ensure that learning is optimised for all. She is fascinated by all subjects relating to education, but spends a lot of time reading around the science behind learning and the learning brain.

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