Who Should Teachers Vote For? by @TeacherToolkit

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This is a blog about the forthcoming general election, with a question for all educators; Who Should Teachers Vote For?

A recent report by The Key, reveals that school leaders say they are overworked, disenchanted and unsure whether any political party is equipped to take education forward. The annual State of Education report (which surveyed 1,180 school leaders, including head teachers, deputy heads and school business managers) makes for a sobering read with school leaders voicing widespread concern on the State of Education across England.  The report revealed:

General Election 2015 Education The KeyThe Statistics:

  1. Almost six in 10 are unsure which party is best equipped to improve the education system from 2015.
  2. 77% saying they are dissatisfied with the Coalition Government’s performance on education.
  3. Over eight in 10 rated managing teacher workload as the most difficult challenge over the past 12 months, ahead of implementing the removal of National Curriculum levels (75.3%) and managing teachers’ morale (69.6%).
  4. 85% feel that morale in the teaching profession has got worse over the past five years.
  5. School leaders believe fewer in-year statutory changes (45.2%), reduced teacher workload (40.7%) and increased funding (35.3%) will most improve the quality of education.
  6. Almost half believe that the quality of education has got better in the past five years.
  7. 99% think education reforms should be evaluated for their effectiveness while 71.4% say that current systems for accessing and disseminating research are inadequate.

There are a number of comments from sector influencers included in the report.

Who Should I Vote For?

If you are still undecided, there is a useful poll here to try.

Labour:

If you vote for Labour, you will be voting for;

  • Protect education budget for 0-19 year olds so it rises in line with inflation
  • Cut university tuition fees to £6,000 a year
  • Qualified Teacher Status.
  • Cap class sizes at 30 for 5, 6 and 7 year-olds

Conservative:

If you vote for the Conservatives, you will be voting for;

  • Protect school funding per pupil
  • Create at least a further 500 free schools in England by 2020
  • Zero tolerance for failure – immediate support to turn around failing or coasting schools
  • 30 hours free childcare for working parents of 3&4-year-olds

Liberal Democrats:

If you vote for the Liberal Democrats, you will be voting for;

  • Guarantee qualified teachers, a core curriculum and sex education in all state schools
  • Ring-fence the education budget for 2-19 year olds
  • A strategy to end child illiteracy by 2025
  • 15hrs a week free childcare from the end of paid parental leave.

For fuller details, you will need to read each manifesto in detail.

(Source)

General Election 2015 Education The Key

The full report can be found on The Key website, here and is well-worth a look.

Manifesto Guide:

If you are still unsure what to do, then click the excellent guide here and click on the education link.

Why not readIf I Were Education Secretary by @TeacherToolkit

@SDupp Cartoon Politics

@TeacherToolkit

In 2010, Ross Morrison McGill founded @TeacherToolkit from a simple Twitter account in which he rapidly became the 'most followed teacher on social media in the UK'. In 2015, he was nominated for '500 Most Influential People in Britain' in The Sunday Times as one of the most influential in the field of education - he remains the only classroom teacher to feature to this day ... Sharing online as @TeacherToolkit, he rebuilt this website (c2008) into what you are now reading, as one of the 'most influential blogs on education in the UK', winning the number one spot at the UK Blog Awards (2018). Today, he is currently a PGCE tutor and is researching 'social media and its influence on education policy' for his EdD at Cambridge University. In 1993, he started teaching and is an experienced school leader working in some of the toughest schools in London. He is also a former Teaching Awards winner for 'Teacher of the Year in a Secondary School, London' (2004) and has written several books on teaching (2013-2018). Read more...

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