Newly Qualified Teachers’ Annual Survey

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How good is teacher-training for Newly Qualified Teachers, and what pathway supports those new to the profession?

I’ve taken the time to skim-read through this 105-page report to offer readers some insight into what the DfE asks of our Newly Qualified Teachers. I’ve only just found the time to publish this post after it has lurked behind the scenes for the past few months …

Rationale:

In the academic year 2013/14, 32,779 individuals embarked on an initial teacher training (ITT) course with the aim of gaining qualified teacher status (QTS – source). In February 2015, six months into their first teaching year, the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) invited newly qualified teachers (NQTs) to take part in a survey regarding the quality of their training. This included postgraduates from the 2013/14 cohort and undergraduates who had, generally, started their training in the 2011/12 academic year.

A total of 7,770 responses to the survey were received, a response rate of 24%. The survey was sent to all eligible NQTs for whom NCTL held an email address at the end of 2014. NCTL did not have a contact email address for just over 5,000 of the eligible NQTs.

There are over 450,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) teachers in England, 96% of whom have qualified teacher status (QTS). Every year, over 20,000 newly qualified teachers join the school workforce.

In academic year 2013/14, 32,779 individuals embarked on an initial teacher training course with the aim of gaining qualified teacher status. One in five new entrants had started a School Direct training route.

NQT numbers

In financial year 2013-14, NCTL paid £287.5 million in grants towards the cost of initial teacher training.

Summary:

To understand the composition of the sample in terms of provider type, route, and qualification stage, the DfE have divided the sample into nine kinds of training as follows:

  • Higher Educational Institution, Provider-led training, Undergraduate
  • Higher Educational Institution, Provider-led training, Postgraduate
  • Higher Educational Institution, School Direct (fee) or self-funded, Postgraduate
  • Higher Educational Institution, School Direct (salaried), Postgraduate
  • School Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT) provider, Provider-led training, Postgraduate
  • School Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT) provider, School Direct (fee) or self-funded, Postgraduate
  • School Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT) provider, School Direct (salaried), Postgraduate
  • Teach First
  • Employment Based Initial Teacher Training (EBITT) provider, Provider-led training, Postgraduate (deferred trainees).

Good or Better?

The quality of initial teacher training is seen as at least good by 89% of primary trained respondents and 90% of secondary trained respondents. 77% of primary trained respondents thought that their training was good or very good in preparing them to teach reading, including phonics and comprehension.

Secondary trained respondents were far less likely to rate this aspect of their training as good or very good. 21% of secondary trained respondents rated this aspect of their training as poor.

86% of primary trained respondents and 83% of secondary trained respondents, thought that their training was good or very good in preparing them to establish and maintain a good standard of behaviour in the classroom.

Questions:

How could we make this figure better? And what could we do to equip schools to re-visit behaviour training for those in their 2nd-5th years of teaching?

shutterstock_267055247 Portrait of a Questioning Woman Holding Happy and Unhappy Survey Mood Board

Image: Shutterstock

Download:

Download the full report here: Newly Qualified Teachers Annual Survey 2015

TT.

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@TeacherToolkit

In 2010, Ross Morrison McGill founded @TeacherToolkit from a simple Twitter account through which he rapidly became the 'most followed teacher on social media in the UK'. In 2015, he was nominated as one of the '500 Most Influential People in Britain' by The Sunday Times as a result of being most influential in the field of education. He remains the only classroom teacher to feature to this day ... Sharing resources and ideas online as @TeacherToolkit, he has built this website (c2008) which has been described as one of the 'most influential blogs on education in the UK', winning the UK Blog Awards (2018). Read more...

One thought on “Newly Qualified Teachers’ Annual Survey

  • 28th March 2016 at 4:45 am
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    I firmly believe that teacher leaders are key to creating and sustaining great teachers, particularly those new to the profession. Having a new teacher mentor (whose main goal is to support new teachers) is vital in this process. Additionally, instructional coaches are important in supporting teachers directly with improved instruction and student achievement.

    Even the best teacher-preparation programs would never be able to replicate the amount of growth that can occur in the first years of teaching when new teachers receive consistent and constructive support in their classroom.

    Thanks for the post!

    Reply

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