Toxic Headteacher: When A Bully Plays With Your Career

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What happens when the education system lets you down?

I am no longer a teacher because of a toxic Headteacher and I fear that my story may be all too familiar. I write to raise awareness and for closure. That chapter in my life is over; I am happy once again.

Leadership gloating

I was a member of the senior leadership team (SLT). It was custom and practice that emails would be sent day and night and throughout the weekend despite our policy stating differently. A work-life balance did not exist.

One such Sunday I received an email from the head teacher to our SLT gloating that they had got rid of a member of staff and had two more to go, by whatever means necessary. The head used a derogatory term that I cannot use here for fear of recognition. The following week I expressed my discomfort to the deputy head and as is custom and practice, they agreed but nothing was done.

I continued to challenge decisions being made but knew that my card was marked. Things began escalating when I was told to leave my union to show my loyalty! The politics were ugly and things were toxic.

The headteacher decided …

It is worth noting that I wasn’t a big trade unionist, up to this point I’d used them for the discounts my membership brought and nothing else. How things changed!  I received a written apology which accepted that the things were said; but that I over-reacted. For the first time in a 15+ year career, I had brought the union into school; I had a bullseye on my back and had become a moving target.

The head teacher took on my performance management and that of my team. Suddenly, I am an inadequate teacher; I am unable to complete documents and I am too generous when assessing my team. All things that were disproven by Ofsted and other members of the SLT – conducting paired observations and exams analysis – but the head teacher had decided.

Things reached ‘toxic levels’ when the head teacher accused me of sharing a Sunday night email with colleagues. This is something that I did not do. Despite the head’s best efforts, I remained professional in the face of adversity. Even though there was no evidence, letters were issued inviting me to a disciplinary hearing. The Headteacher believed it was me.

I made contact with my union and asked if they could get me out of the school by whatever means necessary. I would not and could not work for such an immoral, unethical, narcissist.

Beware of settlement agreements

Settling agreements are deeply unsettling. I, like so many others, (4 similar stories in the two years I was there) reached an agreement. The letter stipulated an agreed reference; proformas for recruitment would be completed in the spirit of the settlement agreement and that the terms would remain confidential.

  • Interview One: My reference is titled an ‘Agreed Reference’. A breach you say?
  • No, an administrative error. I apologise. Oops.
  • Interview Two: “Tell me, can you work well with senior leaders?”
  • Phone calls have taken place, and not in the “spirit of the agreement”.
  • The Union response? “There is nothing we can do.”
  • Interview Three: I ask for interview notes. Scribbled out but clearly legible “XXX is trouble”.
  • This wasn’t in my agreement! Indeed I have an unblemished record, but clearly, the head teacher has decided.

As I write this, my union is procrastinating.

My advice, beware when taking a settlement agreement; the union is happy to be a stretcher bearer and negotiate an agreement for you, but they are not so happy to push for ‘legal action’ when the head teacher breaches the agreement

I am no longer a teacher. That chapter in my life is over; I am happy.

A Teacher

I'm a teacher and sometimes I'm a combination of more than one voice. I'm sharing the things that are going on in our schools - things that need to be talked about and brought to your attention via anonymity - meaning I'm safe from attribution and can therefore speak freely and openly. Please don't be offended.

11 thoughts on “Toxic Headteacher: When A Bully Plays With Your Career

  • 11th November 2018 at 9:12 pm
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    This article was very close to my heart. For very different reasons (and I’m bound by the terms of a non-disclosure agreement) I have been forced to resign from a teaching position in another country. This country is rife with bullying, both in schools and the wider workforce, and I have not met many people who haven’t experienced work-place bullying at some level. The toxic environment in which I have spent the last few years working, with leadership making every wrong decision they possibly could, has led to me being jobless and bereft of confidence. In the UK, I was considered a highly effective teacher. Years of being devalued and eventually being given the choice of suing my school at great cost to myself, or walking away with a pathetic settlement agreement, has left my family and I in pieces. And all this in the context of me getting the best results in the school and being hugely popular with kids and parents alike. In the end, the toxic power-brokers won out. As it stands, I have no intention of walking into a classroom again, which is sad because I valued my profession and the impact I had on young people. Staff well-being is by far the most important issue of teaching today. Its also something that is in desperate need of addressing in both the UK and the country in which I now work(ed).

    Reply
  • 12th November 2018 at 8:57 am
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    I too have left teaching because of a bullying head. It wasn’t just me though. By the end of three years, nearly the whole teaching staff had left and around 30 staff in total. I appealed to the union, and was told they wouldn’t support me because it was my word against his. I lodged a formal grievance which somehow was turned into a complaint. I am so much happier now, to not be in education. I don’t actually know how anyone does it anymore under such intense pressure from so many sources. Your managers are supposed to support you, mine didn’t and unfortunately, it seems to be the case in so many schools now.

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  • 13th November 2018 at 10:43 am
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    I love my current job and my current head was previously a deputy at my old school. He has a high opinion of me, and in my workplace I feel valued. In my previous post, however, I felt hounded simply for being the wrong kind of person. The Head did not like me on a personal level and it remains unclear why – I suspect because I am the type of person he acted at being, and fooled nobody. He insisted on a protocol for all teachers, including scripted language in both classroom speech and within emails. Everything I did was wrong – the way I sat, the way I spoke, the way I scribbled on paper during a staff training session. I existed in a culture of fear, waiting for what was next. I cannot go into how many things he put me through without being specific enough to give him away. he is no longer in post, thankfully. A good Head who supports you and allows you to be yourself is invaluable and I cannot express my gratitude enough for having one now.

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  • 14th November 2018 at 12:17 am
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    This exists almost everywhere. Some people become so consumed with the position that they forgot what they are there for. Leadership that’s understood negatively. Humility, forgotten.

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  • 14th November 2018 at 10:40 am
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    Same here. Had to leave a job I loved because of the head. Why are they allowed to continue and have power over their staff and decide who stays and who goes? I feel so bitter and angry. Trying to move forward but it’s hard.

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  • 14th November 2018 at 10:51 pm
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    I am working with a head that is very similar. The better you are the worse he looks. Will not make any decisions and hates to admit you have good ideas and are productive. He protected two bullying members if staff that all slt knew were purposefully sabotaging my work in the school with t and l. Both close to retirement and clearly not liking any change. Rather than deal with these two members of staff he then went on to start an investigation against me. Powerless, i knew I had to play the game and make it go away. Everything he had said was rubbish- we both knew it! Now, a few months on I’ve made a grievance against him, it’s the only way I could survive. I knew I was being watched carefully. I’ve been creating a time line of events for my union. I can’t believe I put up with so much!!!! I was failed on even single level by this head teacher who couldn’t see past his own ego! What’s more he’s still being protected by the powers at the top- all politics!!! The only way to survive is to ignore your instincts that something is seriously wrong, which means you have to compromise your integrity. For some it’s just not worth it. I can’t wait to get out. I’m going to find a new job and get out quick!!! Ive even considered leaving teaching. At the end of the day I think it’s about the personal investment good teachers put into their work. You wake up and realise it’s just not worth it!!!!

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  • 20th November 2018 at 9:33 pm
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    This sounds very familiar… I’m in a very upsetting situation right now and hoping to get out but worried about references. Last year my observations were all excellent, children made good progress and I am liked by pupils, parents and (most!) staff. However, the head has taken a dislike to me and has tried to criticise me in any way possible, including resorting to blatant lies. I responded to all unfair allegations as I wanted to set the record straight. Now I am under constant surveillance – extra observations, extra ‘book looks’. What’s worse is that my class is suffering for it too and, bless ’em, they don’t understand why. Their recent achievements haven’t been acknowledged by school at all. In a school that hands out certificates for everything, this has really stood out and parents are confused as to why. Right… Off to work on job applications!

    Reply
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