10 @OfstedNews MythBusters by @TeacherToolkit

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This is blog about the recent updates published by OfSTED on 11th March 2015. This document is commonly known as, OfSTED Inspections: Clarification for Schools and can be found here.

True or False:

Which of the following statements are True or False?

  1. Do Ofsted inspectors expect to see individual lesson plans? True or false?
  2. Do Ofsted inspectors require previous lesson plans? True of False?
  3. Do Ofsted inspectors grade individual lessons? True of False?
  4. Do Ofsted inspectors grade individual teachers? True of False?
  5. Do Ofsted inspectors expect schools to undertake a specified amount of lesson observation? True of False?
  6. Should schools provide details of pay grades for individual teachers? True of False?
  7. Do Ofsted inspectors expect to see truck loads of marking? True of False?
  8. Do Ofsted inspectors expect to see a particular frequency of marking? True of False?
  9. Do Ofsted inspectors require evidence of oral feedback? True of False?
  10. If marking is an area for improvement, will Ofsted inspectors pay careful attention to the way recommendations are written? True of False?

MythBusters by @TeacherToolkit

Well, how did you get on? Click here to challenge others.

If you answered False to 9 of the 10 questions written above, well done! Number 10 was indeed, True! Click here to celebrate.

On Lesson Planning:

  • Ofsted does not require schools to provide individual lesson plans to inspectors. Equally, Ofsted does not require schools to provide previous lesson plans.
  • Ofsted does not specify how planning should be set out, the length of time it should take or the amount of detail it should contain. Inspectors are interested in the effectiveness of planning rather than the form it takes

On Grading of Lessons:

  • Ofsted does not award a grade for the quality of teaching for any individual lessons visited and it does not grade individual lessons. It does not expect schools to use the Ofsted evaluation schedule to grade teaching or individual lessons.

On Lesson Observations:

  • Ofsted does not require schools to undertake a specified amount of lesson observation.
  • Ofsted does not expect schools to provide specific details of the pay grade of individual teachers who are observed during inspection.

On Pupils’ Work:

  • Ofsted does not expect to see a particular frequency or quantity of work in pupils’ books or folders. Ofsted recognises that the amount of work in books and folders will depend on the subject being studied and the age and ability of the pupils.
  • Ofsted recognises that marking and feedback to pupils, both written and oral, are important aspects of assessment. However, Ofsted does not expect to see any specific frequency, type or volume of marking and feedback; these are for the school to decide through its assessment policy. Marking and feedback should be consistent with that policy, which may cater for different subjects and different age groups of pupils in different ways, in order to be effective and efficient in promoting learning.
  • While inspectors will consider how written and oral feedback are used to promote learning, Ofsted does not expect to see any written record of oral feedback provided to pupils by teachers.
  • If it is necessary for inspectors to identify marking as an area for improvement for a school, they will pay careful attention to the way recommendations are written to ensure that these do not drive unnecessary workload for teachers.

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@TeacherToolkit

In 2010, Ross Morrison McGill founded @TeacherToolkit from a simple Twitter account in which he rapidly became the 'most followed teacher on social media in the UK'. In 2015, he was nominated for '500 Most Influential People in Britain' in The Sunday Times as one of the most influential in the field of education - he remains the only classroom teacher to feature to this day ... Sharing online as @TeacherToolkit, he rebuilt this website (c2008) into what you are now reading, as one of the 'most influential blogs on education in the UK', winning the number one spot at the UK Blog Awards (2018). Today, he is currently a PGCE tutor and is researching 'social media and its influence on education policy' for his EdD at Cambridge University. In 1993, he started teaching and is an experienced school leader working in some of the toughest schools in London. He is also a former Teaching Awards winner for 'Teacher of the Year in a Secondary School, London' (2004) and has written several books on teaching (2013-2018). Read more...

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